Engine Department


Many engine department courses have prerequisites. For example, to be accepted for Advanced Refrigeration/Containers, students must have successfully completed Basic Marine Electrician and Refrigeration System Maintenance and Operations

 

Automated Cargo Operations

This six-week course of instruction in the pumpman career track includes classroom and simulator training in all facets of liquid cargo loading and discharge. The curriculum consists of cargo properties and emergency procedures, operation and maintenance of valves and pumps, loading procedures, cargo pump operations, cargo measurement, discharging procedures, ballasting procedures, tank cleaning, inert gas systems and more..

Prerequisites: QMED-Any Rating Class 3 or QMED Junior Engineer/Pumpman Class 3. Recommended: Basic and Intermediate Math and Computer Basic Advanced plant maintenance must be completed for advancement to QMED Class 2

Basic Auxiliary Plant Operations (SHLSOS-51)

Applicants completing our 140-hour Basic Auxiliary Plant Operations course and who present our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center WITHIN 1 YEAR of the completion of training, satisfy the examination requirements of 46 CFR 12.15-9 for the General Safety examination module, PROVIDED they have also completed either our 63-hour Basic Motor Plant Operations course and/or our 70-hour Basic Steam Plant Operations course. Applicants who have successfully completed our course need not present individually completed “Control Sheets” for the assessments in application for STCW certification.

 

The objective of this course is to provide students with knowledge and practical operational skills required of rated engine department watchstanders as they sail in the capacity of FOWT. This objective is accomplished through classroom lectures and shore-side auxiliary plant simulator practical exercises.

Prerequisites: Same as FOWT program

Basic Electricity (SHLSOS-52)

This is a 10-day course designed for students who have completed the Ratings Forming Part of an Engineering Watch program or rated engine department personnel desiring to upgrade their skills. The course is designed for those seeking qualification as a QMED and Junior Engineer endorsement. The course provides the mariner electrical skills required of a rated member of the engine department. Topics covered include the fundamentals of electricity, electrical safety, batteries, direct current circuits, alternating current theory, D.C. machines, A.C. machines, motor controllers, distribution systems, propulsion systems and communication systems. Detailed learning objectives are identified in Section II.

Prerequisites: Tankerman Familiarization Dangerous Liquids (DL) course, Basic Auxiliary Plant Operations course, Fireman Oiler Watertender (FOWT) program or hold FOWT endorsement, 6 months’ equivalent sea service in the engine room

Basic Motor Plant Operations (SHLSOS-63)

This is an upgrade course for rated Oilers as prescribed in table A-III/4 of the STCW Code, and 46 CFR 12.15-7, and 12.15-9. The course provides skills required of rated engine department watchstanders. Steam and water cycle and steam thermodynamics and components are covered as well as steam plant simulator operations, casualty control procedures, maintenance, watchkeeping, and conducting machinery space rounds.

Basic Refrigeration & Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) (SHLSOS-64)

The Paul Hall Center’s Basic Refrigeration & Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) course is a 10-day (70 hour) course for students who have completed the Ratings Forming Part of an Engineering Watch program or rated engine department personnel desiring to upgrade their skills. The course is a stand-alone course within the Qualified Member of the Engine Department (QMED) program and is designed for those seeking qualification as a QMED and Junior Engineer endorsement.

The course provides the mariner the cognitive and practical mechanical skills required of rated engine department personnel in the area of Basic Refrigeration and HVAC as they sail in the capacity of Junior Engineer during voyages on U.S.-flagged vessels. This objective is accomplished through classroom lectures and practical exercises. Proficiency and competency assessments are conducted through knowledge-based written tests and practical demonstrations of skills. Areas covered are electrical and refrigeration safety, refrigeration theory, an introduction to the refrigeration cycle and systems, troubleshooting, and an introduction to HVAC systems. Detailed learning objectives are identified in Section II.

Basic Steam Plant Operations (SHLSOS-73)

This course is designed for entry level engine department personnel desiring to upgrade to rated Firemen/Watertenders and Oilers (FOWT). It exceeds requirements prescribed in table A-III/4 of the STCW Code. The objective of this course is to provide the mariner skills required of rated engine department watchstanders in the area of steam plant watchstanding. This objective is accomplished through classroom lectures as well as shoreside steam plant simulator practical exercises. Areas covered are the steam and water cycle and steam thermodynamics, boiler types and classification, boiler waterside construction and arrangements, boiler fireside construction and arrangements, air registers and fuel atomizers, forced draft systems, fuel oil service systems, flame/smoke and stack gas analysis, automatic combustion controls, boiler protective devices, and boiler water chemistry and treatment. Also included are turbine types and classification, turbine construction, turbine protective devices and operating controls, steam condensers, condensate systems and air removal equipment, direct contact heaters, feed systems, steam systems, condensate drains systems, steam plant propulsion machinery, lubricating oil systems, and sea water systems. Additionally, steam plant simulator operations, casualty control procedures, burner atomizer maintenance, manual light-off of non-automated boilers, and watchkeeping and conducting machinery space rounds are covered.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Paul Hall Center Unlicensed Apprentice Training Program, the Auxiliary Plant Operations course, basic safety training, 6 months’ or equivalent sea service in the engine room.

Diesel Engine Technology

This four-week course, leading to certification in diesel engine technology, consists of classroom instruction and hands-on training. Topics of instruction include diesel engine theory; two- and four-stroke cycle operating principles; and the construction, operation, maintenance, repair and troubleshooting of low-, medium-and high-speed diesel engines. Also covered are associated auxiliaries including intake and exhaust systems, lubrication and cooling systems, and fuel injection and starting systems. Students receive practical training in the operation and repair of diesel engines on board school training vessels.

Prerequisites: QMED-Any Rating or equivalent inland experience


Engineering Plant Maintenance (SHLSOS-191)

The 140-hour Engineering Plant Maintenance course is designed for mariners who have completed the Ratings Forming Part of an Engineering Watch program or who are rated engine department personnel desiring to upgrade their skills. The course is a stand-alone course within the Qualified Member of the Engine Department (QMED) Program and is for those seeking qualification as a QMED and USCG certification as a Junior Engineer/Deck Engineer rating, or for those already holding a rating to earn the Junior Engineer/Deck Engineer rating or acquire the requisite metalworking and mechanical maintenance skills.

The course provides mariners the cognitive and practical mechanical skills required of a rated member of the engine department. This is accomplished through classroom lectures and practical exercises. Proficiency and competency assessments are conducted through knowledge-based written tests and practical demonstrations of skills. Topics covered include the mechanics of pumps, drive couplings, heat exchangers, valves, distilling plants, oil/water separators, air compressors, marine sewage treatment plants, auxiliary boilers, and hydraulic systems, the fundamentals of diesel engines, bearings and gears, lubrication theory, lubrication systems and maintenance, fuel systems, and purifiers.

Prerequisites: STCW certification in all areas of basic safety training, successful completion of the SHLSS Fireman Oiler Water Tender (FOWT) program or hold FOWT or Oiler rating endorsements.

Fireman, Oiler & Watertender (FOWT) (SHLSOS-382)

Applicants completing Basic Auxiliary Plant Operations and both Basic Motor Plant Operations and Basic Steam Plant Operations will meet the requirements for endorsement as FOWT. (These classes are described elsewhere as stand-alone courses.) Applicants completing Basic Auxiliary Plant Operations and either Basic Motor Plant Operations or Basic Steam Plant Operations will be eligible for an FOWT (Restricted) endorsement.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Paul Hall Center Unlicensed Apprentice Training Program; successful completion of the unlicensed apprentice sea voyage and required sea projects; unlicensed apprentice sea voyage performance evaluations within the engine department as completed by the First Assistant Engineer of at least satisfactory or better; recommendation by the unlicensed apprentice sea voyage participating vessel’s Chief Engineer OR 6 months’ sea time as wiper AND STCW certification in all areas of basic safety training; successful completion of the entry-level sea voyage and auxiliary plant familiarization sea project; total USCG-approved sea service or equivalent sea service in the engine room of vessels of at least 6 months; meet all USCG physical standards for qualified members of the engine department. Military veterans meeting the prior military sea service requirement in the engine room of vessels must meet the following entrance requirements: Prior approval to the military veterans program for ratings forming part of an engineering watch; meet all USCG physical standards for qualified members of the engine department

Hydraulics

The curriculum in the four-week hydraulics course blends practical training with classroom work. Fluids, actuators, control devices, pumps, reservoirs, symbols, and hydraulic systems in marine equipment are among the subjects covered in this class. Also addressed are principles of electrical control of hydraulic systems, cargo winches, deck cranes, anchor windlasses, ships’ steering systems, ramps, fire doors, and a variety of other shipboard systems.

Prerequisite: QMED-Any Rating

Junior Engineer

The Junior Engineer Program consists of stand-alone courses 70-hour Basic Propulsion Systems Maintenance, 70-hour Basic Refrigeration & HVAC, 70-hour Basic Electricity, and 203-hour Auxiliary Plant Maintenance courses.

Machinist (SHLSOS-261)

Applicants completing our 102-hour Machinist course, and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy the requirements of 46 CFR 12.15- 9, if presented WITHIN 1YEAR of the completion of training, for the Machinist examination module, provided they also present evidence of completing the requirements to be endorsed with a Junior Engineer rating endorsement prior to commencing the above training. This course provides mariners cognitive and practical mechanical skills in the area of general metalworking and machine tool operations.

 

Prerequisites: SHLSS Junior Engineer or QMED-Any Rating

Marine Electrician (SHLSOS-269)

Applicants completing our 280-hour Marine Electrician course, and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy the requirements of 46 CFR 12.15-9, if presented WITHIN 1YEAR of the completion of training, for the Electrician examination module, provided they also present evidence of acquiring at least 90 days’ engine room service while endorsed as a QMED–Junior Engineer prior to commencing the above training. This course provides engine department personnel with the theoretical and practical knowledge and skills necessary to perform maintenance and repair operations on motors, generators, and controllers on board ship.

Prerequisite: 6 months QMED, SHLSS Junior Engineer, or QMED-Any Rating

 

Marine Refrigeration Technician (SHLSOS-274)

The Paul Hall Center’s Marine Refrigeration Technician course is a six-week (210-hour) course designed for mariners who are employed, or may be employed, on U.S.-flag vessels. Training meets or exceeds requirements of 46 CFR Section 12.15-9 (b) for Refrigeration Engineer. The objective of the Marine Refrigeration Technician course is to provide engine department personnel with the theoretical and practical knowledge and the skills necessary to perform maintenance and repair operations on ship’s stores plants, air conditioning plants, cargo refrigeration, ventilation and dehumidification equipment, as well as pantry refrigerators, water coolers, and ice machines. An introduction to refrigerated container units will also be presented. Successful candidates will earn a Paul Hall Center certificate of training.

Each candidate must have six months’ sea time after Junior Engineer, QMED-Any Rating, or SHLSS Junior Engineer

 

Pumpman (SHLSOS-380)

The Paul Hall Center’s Pumpman course is a 70-hour, 10-day course designed for mariners who are employed, or may be employed, on U.S.-flag vessels. Training meets or exceeds requirements of 46 CFR Sec. 12.15-9 (c) for Pumpman. The objective of the Pumpman course is to provide engine department personnel with the theoretical and practical knowledge and the skills necessary to operate, maintain, and repair the equipment associated with the handling of liquid cargo onboard a tankship. Topics covered in the Pumpman course are Inert Gas Systems, Crude Oil Washing (COW) Systems, Vapor Recovery, and two days of assessment in the Cargo Simulator. On successful completion of this course, students will be awarded a Paul Hall Center certificate.

Each student must have SHLSS Junior Engineer or QMED-Any Rating, tanker familiarization, U.S. Coast Guard requirements and machinist

 

Refrigerated Containers Advanced Maintenance

This four-week course leads to certification in refrigerated containers maintenance and consists of classroom and practical shop training. The training experience enables students to assume the duties of a maintenance electrician on board ships carrying refrigerated containers. Students receive training in all phases of refrigerated container unit operation, maintenance, repair, and troubleshooting. This includes the various types of engines, refrigeration, and electrical systems.
The course is designed to help studentsdevelop a systematic approach to troubleshooting and maintenance procedures.

Prerequisites: SHLSS Junior Engineer or QMED-Any Rating, Marine Electrician and Marine Refrigeration Technician

 

Welding (IMET 210)

Classroom instruction and hands-on training compose this four-week course, which features practical training in electric arc welding and cutting and oxyacetylene brazing, welding, and cutting.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites


The course schedule may change to reflect the needs of the membership, the industry or the national interest. Seafarers should continue to consult each monthly edition of the Seafarers LOG for the most up-to-date course schedule.

For additional information, contact the Paul Hall Center, P.O. Box 75, Piney Point, MD 20674-0075; telephone (301) 994-0010. Please note that students should check in the Saturday before their course's start date. The courses listed here will begin promptly on the morning of the start dates.

In addition, basic vocational support program courses are offered throughout the year, one week prior to the AB, QMED, FOWT, Third Mate, Tanker Assistant and Water Survival courses. An introduction to computer courses will be self-study.