Deck Department


Advanced Navigation (SHLSOS-19)

This course meets the mandatory minimum requirements for knowledge, understanding, and proficiency in Table A-II/2 of STCW 1995 for the function, “Navigation at the Management Level.” It is intended for mariners sailing or wishing to sail aboard U.S.A.-flagged ships under contract to Seafarers International Union and who meet all of the requirements to enroll in the course. This functional element provides detailed knowledge to support the training outcomes related to the Navigation at the Management Level. This course supports training in the following Management Level control sheets: M-1-1A, Create a Navigation Plan; M-1-1B, Position Reporting Systems; M-1-2G, Great Circle Sailing; M-1-2H, Mercator Sailing – Course & Distance; M-1-2I, Mercator Sailing – Final Position; M-1-3A, Position Fix by Terrestrial Bearings; M-1-4A, GPS Waypoint Entry; M-2-1A, Determine Magnetic compass Deviation; M-2-1B, Construct a Deviation Table; M-2-1C, Amplitude of the Sun; M-2-1D, Apply Compass Error to Magnetic Course; M-1-2E, Apply Compass Error to Magnetic Bearings; and M-2-1F, Apply Compass Error to Gyrocompass Course.

Prerequisite: Meet eligibility requirements for Management level license

Advanced Shiphandling (SHLSOS-22)

This course meets the requirements from IMO model course 7.01 and the STCW Code Table A-II/2 for the training of Masters and Chief Officers in reference to maintaining safety and security of the crew and passengers and the operational condition of safety equipment. The objective is for students to have a practical understanding of shiphandling. Students will apply lecture material to practical simulator exercises designed to meet the assessment standard of this course. This functional element provides detailed knowledge to support the training outcomes related to the Navigation at the Management Level.

This course specifically addresses the following Advanced Shiphandling (Management Level) assessments: M-7-1A Actions after Grounding, M-7-2A Re-floating a Grounded Ship, M-7-3A Prepare for Collision, M-7-3B Actions After a Collision, M-7-4A Emergency Steering, M-7-5A Emergency Towing, M-8-1A Maneuver to Embark/Disembark a Pilot, M-8-2A Transit Restricted Waters, M-8-3A Constant Rate of Turn Techniques, M-8-4A Shallow Water Effects—Squat, M-8-5A Shallow Water Effects—Passing Vessels, M-8-6A Vessel Docking—Starboard Side To, M-8-6B Vessel Docking—Port Side To, M-8-7A Turn vessel with Tug Assistance, M-8-8A Anchoring, M-8-9A Dragging anchor.

Prerequisite: Meet eligibility requirements for Management level license

Apprentice Mate (Steersman) (SHLSOS-31) (NST 249)

The Paul Hall Center’s 103-hourApprentice Mate (Steersman), Near Coastal course is a self-certifying course for mariners who are employed, or maybe employed, on uninspected towing vessels sailing under U.S. flag or registered/documented under any political subdivision in the United States. Training meets or exceeds requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(i) for original issuance or 46 CFR10. 209(c)(iii) for renewal of a license as Apprentice Mate (Steersman) of Towing Vessels (Near Coastal and Great Lakes;—OR—(2) the examination requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(i) for original issuance or 46 CFR 10. 209(c)(iii) for renewal of a license as Master of Towing Vessels(Near Coastal and Great Lakes) provided that they also provide evidence of service in the towing industry before May 21,2001, AND that the requirements of 46CFR 10.464(h) are also met.

After obtaining the requisite sea service and fulfilling other U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) requirements pertaining to this license, successful students will be able to take responsibility for the safety of an inspected towing vessel; be aware of obligations under Coast Guard regulations concerning safety and protection of passengers, crew, and the marine environment; and, be able to take the practical measures necessary to meet those obligations. Successful students will be issued a certificate of completion for an Apprentice Mate (Steersman), Near Coastal course.

Prerequisites: Radar Observer Unlimited certificate; Able Seaman endorsement (any)

Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA) (SHLSOS-37)

Applicants completing our 32-hour Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA) course, including successful demonstration of all practical assessments, satisfy the ARPA training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC) and of 46 CFR10.205(m)(1). The practical assessments conducted in this course are equivalent to the following assessments from the National Assessment Guidelines for TableA-II/1 of the STCW Code: OICNW-3-2A; OICNW-3-2B; OICNW-3-2C;OICNW-3-2D; OICNW-3-2E; OICNW-3-2F; OICNW- 3-2G; OICNW-3-2H;OICNW-3-2I; OICNW-3-2J; OICNW-3-2K; OICNW-3-2L; and OICNW-3- 2M. (Navigation exercises assume background in chart work and coastal navigation.)

This course of instruction incorporates the use of ARPA simulation equipment to operate, observe, and use the radar plotting aids. Students gain an understanding of the limitations of the aids as well as their performance factors, sensor inputs and malfunctions and gain knowledge of tracking capabilities, processing, operational warnings, and target acquisition.

Prerequisite: Radar Observer

Basic Meteorology (SHLSOS-62) (NST 239)

Any applicant who has successfully completed our 40-hour Meteorology (Operational Level) course will satisfy the Meteorology training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC). The practical assessments conducted in this course will be accepted as the equivalent of OICNW-1-7A; OICNW-1-7B; and OICNW-1-7C from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code. Applicants who have successfully completed the course need not present completed “Control Sheets” for these assessments in application for STCW certification.

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service

Bridge Resource Management (SHLSOS-75)

Applicants completing our 30-hour Bridge Resource Management course satisfy the requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(o) and the requirements of Section B-VIII/ 2, Part 3-1 of the STCW Code. Bridge Resource Management-Unlimited is designed for persons with significant shipping experience who hold or are seeking a U.S. Coast Guard license. This course fulfills the training requirements of effective bridge teamwork as set forth in STCW 95, A-II/1, A-II/2, and BVIII/ 2 and 46 CFR 10.25 and 10.209.

Prerequisites: Radar Unlimited, ARPA, License of 200 Gross Tons or greater OR seeking an original third mate or limited license

Bridge Resource Management (1600 Tons or less) (SHLSOS-76)

Students who successfully complete this course will have the knowledge and experience needed to continually reassess the allocation and use of bridge resources using bridge management principles. Applicants completing our 26-hour Bridge Resource Management (1600 Tons) course satisfy the requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(o) and the requirements of Section B-VIII/2, Part 3-1 of the STCW Code. THIS APPROVAL IS LIMITED TO SERVICE UPON VESSELS OF NOT MORE THAN 1600 GROSS TONS (DOMESTIC).

Prerequisites: Radar Unlimited, ARPA, License of 200 gross tons or greater OR in the process of getting license

Celestial Navigation (SHLSOS-103)

Applicants completing our 126-hour Celestial Navigation course with a passing grade of at least 80 percent satisfy the Celestial Navigation training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC). In conjunction with this course, any approved instructor is authorized to sign off for a successful demonstration on the students’ “Control Sheets” for the following assessments from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code: OICNW-1-1A; OICNW-1-1B; OICNW-1-1C; OICNW-1-1D; OICNW-1-1E and OICNW-1-1F.

The course covers the areas of celestial navigation required for licensing as a second or third mate unlimited and for all limited licenses. Students are instructed in latitude observations by sun and Polaris, running fixes by sun, stars, and planets, compass error by amplitude and azimuth, star identification, and care and use of the sextant.

Prerequisites: ARPA, Radar Observer

Crisis Management & Human Behavior (SHLSOS-138)

Applicants completing our 7-hourCrisis Management & Human Behavior course satisfy: (1) the Crisis Management & Human Behavior training requirements of Table A-V/2and Paragraph 5 of Section A-V/2 of the STCW Code for Passenger Ships Other Than Ro-Ro Passenger Ships;—AND—(2) the Passenger Safety training requirements of Paragraph 4 of Section A-V/2 of the STCW Code for Passenger Ships Other Than Ro-Ro Passenger Ships.

This course is designed for any person responsible for the safety of passengers in an emergency on passenger ships. The training includes organizing the safe movement of passengers when embarking and disembarking, organizing shipboard emergency procedures, optimizing the use of resources, controlling responses to emergencies, controlling passengers and other personnel during emergency situations, and establishing and maintaining effective communications.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Crowd Management (SHLSOS-142)

Applicants completing our 4-hour Crowd Management course satisfy: (1)the Crowd Management training requirements of Paragraph 1 of SectionA-V/3 of the STCW Code for Passenger Ships Other Than Ro-Ro Passenger Vessels;—AND—(2) the Safety Training requirements of Paragraph 3 of Section A-V/3 of the STCW Code for Passenger Ships Other Than Ro-Ro Passenger Vessels. This course profiles the required knowledge and applicable skills for crowd management including controlling a crowd in an emergency, locating safety and emergency equipment on board a vessel, complying with ships’ emergency procedures, effective communications during an emergency, and demonstrating the use of personal lifesaving devices.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Designated Deck Engineer (Non-STCW)

This course prepares the student for the USCG examination for Designated Duty Engineer (DDE). The object of the course is to familiarize the student with the subjects and topics required for successful preparation for the USCG examination and to prepare the student to act in these capacities as outlined in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). Instruction includes the CFR, environmental protection and oil pollution, general safety precautions for engine room personnel, piping, air, hydraulics, power and control systems, refrigeration, heating, air conditioning and ventilation systems, electrical theory and shipboard lighting and auxiliary deck machinery.

Prerequisites: General admission requirements, prior Coast Guard approval letter valid through test dates of the class

Electronic Chart Display Information Systems (ECDIS) (SHLSOS-179)

Applicants completing our 35-hour Electronic Chart Display Information Systems (ECDIS) course are considered to have successfully demonstrated the competencies “Plan and Conduct a Passage and Determine Position: Thorough Knowledge of and Ability to Use ECDIS” of Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code AND “Determine Position and the Accuracy of Resultant Position Fix: Position Determination Using ECDIS With Specific Knowledge of its Operating Principles, Limitations, Sources of Error, Detection of Misrepresentation of information and Methods of Correction to Obtain Accurate Position Fixing” of Table A-II/2 of the STCW Code.

 

The course provides training in the basic theory and use of electronic chart display and information systems (ECDIS) for those who will be in charge of a navigational watch on vessels equipped with ECDIS. Students learn to use, update, and verify electronic chart information. The training comprises all safety-relevant aspects and aims beyond the use of operational controls. All theoretical aspects and major characteristics of ECDIS data, such as data contents, system integration, information layers, and data updating, are covered in depth.

Prerequisites: General admission requirements; ARPA certificate; Radar certificate; Terrestrial and Coastal Navigation training for license preparation; USCG-approved STCW Basic Safety Training course

Electronic Navigation (SHLSOS-181) (NST 246)

Any applicant who has successfully completed our 40-hour Electronic Navigation course will satisfy the Electronic Navigation training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC). The practical assessments in this course will be accepted as the equivalent of the following assessments from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code: OICNW-1-4A; OICNW-1-4B;OICNW-1-4C; and OICNW-1-4D. Applicants who have successfully completed the course need not present completed “Control Sheets” for these assessments in application for STCW certification.

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service, radar and ARPA

Fast Rescue Boats (SHLSOS-193)

Applicants completing our 30-hour Fast Rescue Boats course satisfy the requirements of Table A-VI/2-2 of the STCW Code, Specification of the Minimum Standard of Competence in Fast Rescue Boats. The Pau Hall Center’s Fast Rescue Boats course trains students to handle and take charge of fast rescue boats during of after launch in adverse weather and sea conditions. Students learn how to operate a fast rescue boat engine, use all locating devices, including communication and signaling equipment between the rescue boat and a helicopter and the ship, and how to carry out search patterns.

Prerequisites: Basic Safety, Survival Craft and Rescue Boats other than fast rescue boats.

Global Maritime Distress & Safety System (GMDSS) (SHLSOS-210)

Applicants completing our 70-hour Global Maritime Distress & Safety System (GMDSS) course with a passing grade of at least 75 percent satisfy the GMDSS training requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(n) and Table A-IV/2 of the STCW Code. Applicants for this 70-hour course must hold a 200-ton or greater license, or show a current U.S. Coast Guard approval letter indicating they are eligible to sit for a license greater than 200 tons. The class is designed to meet the requirements set forth in Table A-IV/2 of the amended STCW convention. Topics include principles of the global marine distress and safety system communications, distress alerting and operational procedures for VHF DSC, INMARST-C, MF/HF, NAVTEX, EPIRB, SART, and VHF (SCT). The course blends classroom instruction and practical exercises.

Prerequisites: One year experience as a member of navigational watch on the bridge of an ocean going vessel OR licensed radio officer or engineer

Government Vessels

This three-week class is open to mariners sailing in any department. The course is structured as three on-week, stand-alone modules. The modules may be taken in any order.

Included in the first week are an introduction to the U.S. Military Sealift Command and military vessels, damage control, CBRD (chemical, biological, radiological defense), anti-terrorism level I and hazardous materials training. The second week features forklift operations, underway replenishment and vertical replenishment. Cargo-handling and crane operations are included in the third week. (This course is required of students attending AB or FOWT courses.)

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Magnetic and Gyro Compasses (SHLSOS-262) (NST 240)

Any applicant who has successfully completed our 20-hour Magnetic and Gyro Compasses course will satisfy the Compass—Magnetic and Gyro training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage(ITC). The practical assessments in this course will be accepted as the equivalent of assessments OICNW-1-5A; OICNW-1-5B; OICNW-1-5C; OICNW-1-5D; andOICNW-1-5E from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1of the STCW Code. Applicants who have successfully completed the course need not present completed “Control Sheets” for these assessments in application for STCW certification.

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service

Master 100 Tons (SHLSOS-281)

The Paul Hall Center’s 90-hour Master 100 Tons, Near Coastal course is a self certifying course for mariners who are employed, or may be employed, on passenger vessels sailing under U.S. flag or registered/documented under any political subdivision in the United States. Training meets or exceeds requirements of 46 CFR 10.206(i) for original license, 46 CFR 10.209(c)(iii) for renewal, and 46CFR 209(f) for reissue. Students who present our certificate of training at a regional exam center within one year of the completion of training will satisfy the exam requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(i) for reissuance of a license.

 

After obtaining the requisite sea service and fulfilling other U.S. Coast Guard requirements pertaining to this license, successful students will be able to take responsibility for the safety of an inspected passenger vessel of 100 tons and its passengers; be aware of obligations under Coast Guard regulations concerning safety and protection of passengers, crew, and the marine environment; and, be able to take the practical measures necessary to meet those obligations. Students successfully completing the course will be issued a certificate for successful completion for a Master 100 Ton, Near Coastal license.

Prior to the scheduled class convening date, each candidate must meet the following entrance requirements: Successfully completed a USCG-approved STCW Basic Safety Training course; possess current TWIC, U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential/Document or USCG license; speak, read and understand the English language in accordance with 46 CFR 13.111; provide documented proof of fulfilling the physical examination requirements in accordance with 46CFR 12.15-5; Fundamentals of Navigation, valid Radar Observer Unlimited certificate; Able Seaman endorsement (any)

Medical Care Provider (SHLSOS-310)

Applicants completing our 21-hour Medical Care Provider course satisfy the Medical First Aid training requirements of Section A-VI/4 and Table A-VI/4-1 of the STCW Code and 46 CFR 12.13-1. This course is designed for mariners who are employed or may be employed on U.S.-flag ships. It meets STCW requirements. Students successfully completing this course must take a refresher course within five years or provide information to the U.S. Coast Guard documenting maintenance of medical skills. Cardiopulmonary (CPR) certification must be renewed annually.

 

Training as a Medical First Aid Provider is the second level of medical training required by STCW. Topics include a review of cardiac and airway management, rescuer safety, body structure, examining trauma victims and medical patients, treating head and spinal injuries, burns, musculoskeletal injuries, and rescued persons. Also included are obtaining radio medical advice, administering medication, and sterilization techniques.

Prerequisites: Candidates for the course must possess current certification from the American Red Cross for CPR for the Professional Rescuer or equivalent certification issued through a similar authorizing agency. Candidates also need First Aid.

Oil Spill Prevention and Containment

This one-week course consists of classroom and practical training exercises. Topics include oil types and petroleum products’ behavior on water; pollution prevention regulations; hazardous materials training; spill prevention; absorbents, suction equipment, skimmers, and their proper use; and small boat operations. Students also receive instruction in spill containment booms, boom towing configurations, and anchoring operations.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Personal Safety & Social Responsibilities (SHLSOS-359)

Applicants completing our four-hour Personal Safety & Social Responsibilities course and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy the Personal Safety & Social Responsibilities training requirements of46 CFR 10.205(l)(4) and Section A-VI/1and Table A-VI/1-4 of the Seafarers’ Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) Code. This course provides the unlicensed apprentice candidate with a general understanding and basic knowledge of human relationships, social skills necessary for living and working aboard operational merchant ships, and a working knowledge of issues impacting preparedness for international travel.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Personal Survival Techniques (SHLSOS-363)

Applicants completing our 12-hour Personal Survival Techniques course and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy the Personal Survival training requirements of Section A-VI/1 and Table A-VI/1-1 of the Seafarers’ Training, Certification and Watchkeeping (STCW) Code and 46 CFR10.205(l)(1).

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Proficiency in Survival Craft/Personal Survival Techniques (Lifeboatman)

Applicants completing our 37-hour Proficiency in Survival Craft/Personal Survival Techniques course satisfy: (1) the Survival Craft training requirements of Section A-VI/2 and Table A-VI/2-1 of the STCW Code;—AND—(2) the training requirements of 46 CFR 12.10-3(a)(6) for any endorsement as Lifeboatman, PROVIDED that sea service requirements are also met;—AND—(2) if presented WITHIN 1 YEAR of the completion of training, the written and practical examination requirements of 46 CFR12.10-5 for a Lifeboatman endorsement(exam module 481xx) and the written “Survival Craft” examination requirements for service on vessels not equipped with lifeboats (exam module 441xx or 706xx),—AND—(3) the Personal Survival Techniques training requirements of Section A-VI/1 and Table AVI/1-1 of the STCW Code and 46 CFR10.205(l)(1). This course helps mariners develop the required knowledge and application skills for water survival including launch, use and recovery of survival craft, and the proper use of survival equipment. Additionally, students learn the procedures necessary to take charge and maintain a survival craft and protect embarked personnel while on board.

Prerequisites: 180 days of deck sea time

Radar Observer (Unlimited) (SHLSOS-399)

Applicants completing our five-day Radar Observer (Unlimited) course, including successful demonstration of all practical assessments, satisfy the requirements of 46CFR 10.480 for an endorsement as Radar Observer (Unlimited) and the radar training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC). In conjunction with this course, any approved instructor is authorized to sign off for a successful demonstration on the students’ “Control Sheets” for the following assessments from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code: OICNW-1-2B; OICNW-1-2C; OICNW-3-1A; OICNW-3-1B;OICNW-3-1C; OICNW-3-1D; OICNW-3-1E; OICNW-3-1F; OICNW-3-1G;OICNW-3-1H; OICNW-3-1I; OICNW-3-1J; and OICNW-3-1K. This course features hands-on training and classroom work, including radar theory, observation, operation and use, interpretation and plotting, advanced radar plotting, collision avoidance and navigational exercise. Students operate modern audio-visual and radar simulation gear, as well as the full shiphandling simulator, as they practice controlling and maneuvering a vessel, plotting courses and safely guiding a ship without jeopardizing the safety of other vessels. Also included are practical exercises and lectures covering inland waterway and river navigation and piloting.

Prerequisites: General admission requirements

Radar Observer Recertification (SHLSOS-402)

Applicants completing our one-day Radar Observer Recertification course satisfy the requirements of 46 CFR10.480(d) for renewal of any Radar Observer endorsement. This course does not satisfy any training or assessment requirements of the STCW Convention and STCW Code. (Navigation exercises assume background in chart work and coastal navigation.)

Prerequisites: Radar Observer Unlimited

Radar Observer Refresher (SHLSOS-406)

Applicants completing our three-day Radar Observer Refresher course satisfy the requirements of 46 CFR 10.480(d) for renewal of any Radar Observer endorsement. This course does not satisfy any training or assessment requirements of the STCW Convention and STCW Code. (Navigation exercises assume background in chart work and coastal navigation.)

Prerequisite: Radar Observer Unlimited

Ratings Forming Part of a Navigational Watch/Able Seaman (SHLSOS-416)

Applicants completing our four-week Ratings Forming Part of a Navigational Watch/Able Seaman program satisfy: (1) the training, seagoing service, and assessment requirements of 46 CFR 12.05-3(c) and Section A-II/4 of the STCW Code, Mandatory Minimum Requirements for Certification of Ratings Forming Part of a Navigational Watch;—AND—(2) if presented WITHIN 1 YEAR of the completion of training, the written examination requirements of 46 CFR 12.05-9 for the “Deck General & Navigation General” and “Deck Safety & Rules of the Road” exam modules for any Able Seaman endorsement and the practical (knot tying) examination requirements of 46 CFR 12.05-9 for any Able Seaman endorsement PROVIDED that all other requirements of 46 CFR Subpart 12.05, including sea service, are also met. The course consists of hands-on training and classroom work covering deck seamanship, rules of the road, marlinespike seamanship, helmsmanship, cargo handling, safety, fire fighting, emergency procedures, first aid, anchoring, and mooring, and aids to navigation.

Prerequisites: Sea service, Water Survival (Lifeboatman), STOS
Special: 12 months’ service on deck, 2 months’ sea service under the supervision of the Master, the OIC of the navigational watch, or qualified ratings (STCW)
Limited: 18 months’ service on deck, 2 months’ sea service under the supervision of the Master, OIC, or qualified ratings
Unlimited: 3 years’ deck, 2 months’ sea service under the supervision of the Master or OIC

Search and Rescue (Operational Level) (SHLSOS-447) (NST 245)

Any applicant who has successfully completed our 16-hour Search & Rescue (Operational Level) course will satisfy the Search & Rescue training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC).

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service

Specially Trained Ordinary Seaman (STOS) (SHLSOS-465)

Applicants completing our 70-hour Specially Trained Ordinary Seaman course and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy the training requirements for service as a Specially Trained Ordinary Seaman AND the training and assessment requirements of Table A-II/4 of the STCW Code, “Specification of Minimum Standard of Competence for Ratings Forming Part of a Navigational Watch,” and 46 CFR 12.05- 3(c) PROVIDED they also present evidence of at least six months’ sea-going service performing navigational watchkeeping functions under the supervision of the Master or officer in charge of the navigational watch. If the applicant does not present evidence of six months of this service, he or she satisfies the training and assessment requirements for certification as Rating Forming Part of a Navigational Watch RESTRICTED to lookout duties only. This certification is valid for one year and may not be renewed. This course is designed for deck trainees who need a fast track to Ratings Forming Part of the Navigational Watch. It meets the requirements of 46 CFR12.05.3(c) and STCW Table A-II/4. Topics covered in the course include: anchoring, mooring, knot-tying, gyro and magnetic compass, wheel watch, error chain analysis and pilot interactions, helm control, rules of the road, IALA buoy systems, shipboard communication, helm watch relief and lookout watch.

Prerequisites: UA Program Phases 1and 2, or 180 days as an OS

Tank Barge Dangerous Liquids (SHLSOS-491)

Applicants completing our 38-hour Tank Barge Dangerous Liquids Course and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy the training requirements of 46 CFR 13.309 for an endorsement as Tankerman-PIC (Barge).

Prerequisites: Basic Fire Fighting

Tank Ship Dangerous Liquids (SHLSOS-501)

Applicants completing our 5-day Tank Ship Dangerous Liquids course satisfy the training requirements of 46 CFR 13.113(d) (1) (ii) (A), 13.115 (b) (1),13.209, 13.309, 13.409 or 13.509 for any dangerous liquids tankerman endorsement. This course provides training for masters, chief engineers, officers, and any person with immediate responsibility for the loading, discharging and care in transit or handling of cargo. It comprises a specialized training program appropriate to their duties, including oil tanker safety, fire safety measure and systems, pollution prevention, operational practice and obligations under applicable laws and regulations.

Prerequisites: 3 months’ seagoing service on tankers (DL) OR completion of a Tank Ship Familiarization (Dangerous Liquids) covering STCW Code Section A-V/1 para. 2-8. Fire fighting course in accordance with 47 CFR13.121 Table 13.121(g) OR Paul Hall Center Basic Fire Fighting, USCG-approved STCW Basic Safety Training course

Tank Ship Dangerous Liquids (Simulator) (SHLSOS-503)

Applicants completing our 53-hour Tank Ship Dangerous Liquids (Simulator) course satisfy the training requirements of 46 CFR 13.113(d)(1)(ii)(A), 13.115(b)(1), 13.209, 13.309, 13.409 or 13.509 for any dangerous liquids tankerman endorsement;—AND— receive credit for: (1) two loadings and two discharges which may be applied toward satisfying the requirements of 46 CFR13.203(b)(1);—AND—(2) one commencement of loading and one completion of loading which may be applied toward satisfying the requirements in 46CFR 13.203(b)(2);—AND—(3) one commencement of discharge and one completion of discharge which may be applied toward satisfying the requirements in 46 CFR 13.203(b)(3). This course provides training for masters, chief engineers, officers, and any person with immediate responsibility for the loading, discharging and care in transit or handling of cargo. It comprises as specialized training program appropriate to their duties, including oil tanker safety, fire safety measure and systems, pollution prevention, operational practice and obligations under applicable laws and regulations.

Prerequisites: 3 months’ seagoing service on tankers (DL) OR completion of a Tank Ship Familiarization (Dangerous Liquids) (Paul Hall Center “Tanker Assistant” course) to cover STCW Code Section A-V/1 para. 2-8. Fire fighting course in accordance with 47 CFR13.121 Table 13.121(g) OR Paul Hall Center Basic Fire Fighting, U.S.C.G.-approved STCW Basic Safety Training course

Tank Ship Familiarization (Dangerous Liquids) (SHLSOS-505)

Applicants completing our 63-hour Tank Ship Familiarization (Dangerous Liquids) course satisfy the training requirements of 46 CFR 13.409 for an original endorsement as Tankerman-Assistant DL. This course meets the Code of Federal Regulation requirements for personnel not having the required sea service. The objective of this course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to conduct operations on tankships. Topics include the 16-hour worker health and safety (HAZWOPER) First Responder/ Operations Level, Ship Design and Operation, Cargo Characteristics, Enclosed Space Entry, Cargo Transfer and Shipment, and Pollution Prevention, and Emergency Operations and Response.

Prerequisite: Fire Fighting

Tank Ship Familiarization (Liquefied Gases) (SHLSOS-507)

Applicants completing our 30-hour Tank Ship Familiarization (Liquefied Gases) course and presenting our Certificate of Training at a Regional Exam Center, satisfy: (1) the training requirements of 46 CFR 13.409 for an original endorsement as Tankerman-Assistant (LG); —AND— (2) the tanker familiarization training requirements of paragraphs 1-7 of Section A-V/1 of the STCW Code. This course consists of a safety program designed to meet STCW requirements for those who have not served on LNG ships. The course of instruction includes LNG fire fighting, confined space awareness, LNG nomenclature, LNG ship operations, personal safety, LNG safety, hazardous material, LNG cargo tank (level indicators, temperature), LNG cargo pump (Carter pump construction and ops), inert gas generator (general flow system), nitrogen gas system, LNG vapor compressor, warm-up heater and boil-off heater.

Prerequisite: Advanced Fire Fighting

Vessel Security Officer (SHLSOS-573)

This 12-hour course provides knowledge to those wishing to perform the duties and responsibilities of a Vessel Security Officer (VSO) as defined in section A/2.1.6 (and section A/12.1) of the ISPS Code with respect to the security of a ship, for implementing and maintaining a Ship Security Plan, and for liaising with the Company Security Officer (CSO) and Port Facility Security Officers (PFSOs). Successful students will be able to undertake the duties and responsibilities as Vessel Security Officer as defined in section A/12.2 of the ISPS Code.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Visual Communications (Flashing Light) (SHLSOS-542)

Applicants completing our one-day Visual Communications course with a minimum score of 80 percent will: (1) Satisfy the practical signaling examination requirements (flashing light) of 46 CFR10.401(h) IF presented WITHIN 1 YEAR of the completion of training;—AND—(2) Be considered to have successfully demonstrated the competence “Transmit and Receive In formation by Visual Signaling” of Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code.

Prerequisites: No additional prerequisites

Water Survival (SHLSOS-549)

The Water Survival course delivers 60 hours of training to those who are seeking a MMD endorsement for Lifeboatman as required by 46 CFR. The course also incorporates the personal survival training requirements as outlined in STCW 1995 VI/1. The course provides the student with the required knowledge and application skills for water survival including launch, use and recovery of survival craft, and the proper use of survival equipment. Additionally, the student will understand the procedures necessary to take charge of and maintain survival craft and protect embarked personnel.

Terrestrial & Coastal Navigation (SHLSOS-512) (NST 241)

Any applicant who has successfully completed our 80-hour Terrestrial &Coastal Navigation course will satisfy the Terrestrial Navigation and Coastal Navigation training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC). The practical assessments conducted in this course will be accepted as the equivalent of the following assessments from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table AII/1 of the STCW Code: OICNW-1-2A; OICNW-1-2B; OICNW-1-2C; OICNW-1-2D; OICNW-1-3A;OICNW-1-3B; and OICNW-1-3C.Applicants who have successfully completed the course need not present completed “Control Sheets” for these assessments in application for STCW certification.

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service

Emergency Procedures (Operational Level) (SHLSOS-185) (NST 244)

The Paul Hall Center’s 21-hour Emergency Procedures at the Operational Level course is designed for mariners who are employed, or may be employed, on U.S.-flagged vessels. This stand-alone course is a component of the Paul Hall Center’s Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch (OICNW) Program. The functional elements of this course specifically meet Function 1: Navigation at the Operational Level; Competence 1.4 Respond to Emergencies; and Knowledge, Understanding, and Proficiency 1.4.1 Precautions for Protection and Safety of Passengers of the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) OICNW Model Course No. 7.03 and the requirements of USCG Policy Letter 01-02. No OICNW assessments will be conducted in this course. Successful candidates will earn a Paul Hall Center certificate of training for Emergency Procedures at the Operational Level.

Prior to the scheduled class convening date, each candidate must meet the following entrance requirements:
Successfully completed a USCG-approved STCW Basic Safety Training course; possess current TWIC, U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential/Document or USCG license; speak, read and understand the English language in accordance with 46 CFR 13.111; provide documented proof of fulfilling the physical examination requirements in accordance with 46CFR 12.15-5

Basic Cargo Handling and Stowage (Operational Level) (SHLSOS-101) (NST 242)

The Paul Hall Center’s Basic Cargo Handling and Stowage course is a 40-hour course for students who are employed, or may be employed, on U.S.-flag vessels as required by STCW 1995, as amended, and are licensed or intending to be licensed personnel. On successful completion of this course, students will be able to use cargo plans and tables or diagrams of stability and trim data to calculate the ship’s initial stability, drafts, and trim for any given description of cargo and other weights. They will also be able to determine whether stresses on the ship are within permitted limits by the use of stress data or calculation equipment, or software. They will understand safety precaution used prior to entering enclosed or potentially contaminated spaces.

 

Students should be able to supervise the preparation and dunnaging of holds and the operation of ships’ cargo gear and will be aware of the importance of adequately securing cargo to prevent damage to the ship or cargo. Trainees will identify dangerous goods and know that they are stowed and separated according to requirements of the IMDG Code. They will also know the hazards related to some bulk cargoes and the precautions to take during their loading, carriage, and discharge. Trainees will also have a basic knowledge of the piping and pumping arrangements of oil tankers.
This course specifically addresses “Function: Cargo handling and stowage at the operational level” and “Competence: Monitor the loading, stowage, securing, care during the voyage and the unloading of cargoes” and “Knowledge Under standing and Proficiency: Cargo handling, stowage, and securing” found in Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code, amended 1995. This is accomplished through classroom lecture and practical exercises. Students successfully completing this course will be awarded a Paul Hall Center Basic Cargo and Stowage at the Operational Level course certificate.

Prior to the scheduled class convening date, each candidate must meet the following entrance requirements: Possess a current TWIC, U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential/Document; provide documented proof of fulfilling the physical examination requirements in accordance with 46 CFR 13.125; speak, read and understand the English language in accordance with 46 CFR 13.111; provide documented proof of fulfilling USCG-approved sea time requirements, completion of Basic Stability course

 

Basic Shiphandling and Steering Control Systems (SHLSOS-72) (NST 247)

Any applicant who has successfully completed the 40-hour Basic Shiphandling and Steering Control Systems (Operational Level) course will satisfy the Basic Shiphandling and Steering Control Systems training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC). The practical assessments in this class will be accepted as the equivalent of the following assessments from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code: OICNW-1-6A; OICNW-1-6B; OICNW-5-1A; OICNW-5-1B; andOICNW-5-1C. Applicants who have successfully completed the course need not present completed “Control Sheets” for these assessments in application for STCW certification.

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service

 

Ship Construction and Basic Stability (SHLSOS-449) (NST 243)

The Paul Hall Center’s 40-hour Ship Construction at the Operational Level course is intended to provide training at the basic level for mariners who are employed, or may be employed, on U.S.-flag vessels whose responsibilities include maintaining the seaworthiness of the ship. It takes into account STCW Code Table A-II/1: Function: controlling the operation of the ship and care for persons on board at the operational level; Ship construction. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have general knowledge of the principal structural members of a ship and the proper names for the various parts. At course completion, successful students will receive a Paul Hall Center certificate of completion in Ship Construction at the Operational Level.

This course is open to watchkeeping officers, seamen who are training to become watchkeeping officers, and those who are responsible for loading cargoes. Trainees will be expected to use simple graphs and basic arithmetical skills and must meet the following requirements: USCG-approved STCW Basic Safety Training course; a current TWIC, U.S. Merchant Mariner Credential/Document/or USCG license; read, speak and understand the English language at a level sufficient to perform job duties; provide documented proof of fulfilling the physical examination requirements in accordance with 46 CFR 12.05-7

 

Watchkeeping (Operational Level) (NST 248)

Any applicant who has successfully completed our 80-hour Watchkeeping (Operational Level) course will satisfy the Watchkeeping training requirements for certification as Officer in Charge of a Navigational Watch on vessels of 500 or more gross tonnage (ITC); AND the Bridge Resource Management training requirements of 46 CFR 10.205(o) and the requirements of Section B-VIII/2, Part 3-1 of the STCW Code. The practical assessments conducted in this course will be accepted as the equivalent of assessments OICNW-2-1A; OICNW-2-1B, OICNW-2-1C, OICNW-2-1D, OICNW-2-1E, OICNW-2-1F, OICNW-2-2A, OICNW-2-2B, OICNW-2-2C, OICNW-2-2D, OICNW-2-2E, OICNW-2-2F, OICNW-2-3A, OICNW-2-3B, OICNW-2-3C, OICNW-2-3D, OICNW-2-3E, OICNW-2-3F,OICNW-2-3G, AND OICNW-2-3H from the National Assessment Guidelines for Table A-II/1 of the STCW Code.

 

Applicants who have successfully completed the course need not present completed “Control Sheets” for these assessments in application for STCW certification.

Prerequisite: AB with one year of sea service


The course schedule may change to reflect the needs of the membership, the industry or the national interest. Seafarers should continue to consult each monthly edition of the Seafarers LOG for the most up-to-date course schedule.

For additional information, contact the Paul Hall Center, P.O. Box 75, Piney Point, MD 20674-0075; telephone (301) 994-0010. Please note that students should check in the Saturday before their course's start date. The courses listed here will begin promptly on the morning of the start dates.

In addition, basic vocational support program courses are offered throughout the year, one week prior to the AB, QMED, FOWT, Third Mate, Tanker Assistant and Water Survival courses. An introduction to computer courses will be self-study.